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APPALACHIAN TRAIL MAPS & GUIDES

The printable Appalachian Trail maps and segment guides are provided below as a free community service by TRAILSOURCE.COM to all prospective AT thru-hikers.

The Appalachian Trail, commonly known by backpackers as the A.T., is a popular 2,167 mile thru-hike along a wilderness footpath. The Appalachian Trail is a registered National Scenic Trail that winds along the crest of the Appalachian Mountains from Georgia in the south to Maine in the north. More specifically, the A.T. runs through the scenic wooded and pastoral lands of fourteen eastern US states, stretching from Springer Mountain, Georgia, in the south to Mount Katahdin, Maine, in the north. The Appalachian Trail route is more than 99 percent protected by either federal ownership, state ownership or designated rights-of-way from local land owners. Appalachian Trail Backpacking

The free printable Appalachian Trail maps and guides below are organized by state starting in the south at Springer Mountain, Georgia, and working the way north along the A.T. to Mount Katahdin, Maine, just as you would be thru-hiking. If you enjoy what you find below, please share this resource with other Appalachian Trail hikers and backpackers.

GEORGIA

The Georgia section of the Appalachian Trail (AT) is a short 75 miles through northern Georgia. The southern terminus, or starting point depending on your point of view, of the Appalachian Trail (AT) is located atop remote Springer Mountain, near FS42. The route offers excellent wilderness hiking with road crossings about one-days hike apart. The lower elevations ridges from 3,000 to 4,000 feet in elevation make this stretch a great introduction to would be thru-hikers. Most hikers start in Amicalola State Park on SR52 and use a 8.5 mile approach trail. The blazed trail is easy to follow and there are 11 three-sided shelters in Georgia. Georgia Appalachian Trail Backpacking
(Click For Georgia Appalachian Trail Map)

The trail is maintained by the Georgia Appalachian Trail Club, in cooperation with the Chattachoochee National Forest. The route passes over Big Cedar Mountain, Blood Mountain, Cowrock Mountain, Rocky Mountain and Tray Mountain, and passes through three wilderness areas, including Raven Cliffs, Tray Mountain and Southern Nanatahala Wilderness Areas. A popular resupply/communications point along the trail is Walasi-Yi Center at Neel’s Gap on SR129. Keep in mind that elevations do range from 2,510 feet up to 4,461 feet, so there are a few steep climbs.

The best time of year to experience this section of the Appalachian Trail is from April to early June. Many through hikers are tempted to hit the trail early and venture out in March. They area often disappointed to find plenty of cold rain, sleet and even snow in Georgia. It's best to wait until April, or even late April to start out. Plus, Georgia is very crowded in March and April with plenty of spring break hikers and early thru-hikers. Keep in mind that the heat and humidity in July and August can be down right oppressive.

For some additional reading on the Georgia section of the Appalachian trail, check out the "Appalachian Trail Guide to North Carolina-Georgia". The Georgia AT is also covered in the Appalachian Trail Data Book 2013 by Daniel Chazin. Click here to download the Georgia section of the AT in GPX file-format (left click on link and select "Save As"). Click here for information on additional Georgia hiking trails.

NORTH CAROLINA

The North Carolina section of the Appalachian Trail (AT) runs 88 miles along the western border of the state. From the south, the trail enters North Carolina at Bly Gap and runs north to north of Roan High Knob at US19E. Starting with the Nantahala section in the south, there are numerous 4,000 to 5,000 foot peaks with awesome vistas. Moving north, the AT runs through the Yellow Creek – Wauchecha – Cheoah Mountain areas with steep elevation changes. Next, 70 miles of ridgeline trail runs through the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. The final stretch is in the Pisgah National Forest. The elevation ranges from 1,725 to 5,498 feet. North Carolina Appalachian Trail Backpacking
(Click For North Carolina AT GPS Map)

The best time of year to experience this section of the Appalachian Trail is from mid-May through October. Mid-May in North Carolina? Why not start earlier? Well, there have been many snow storms throughout April in North Carolina believe it or not. Some of their worst winter weather is in April. These storms have left plenty of thru-hikers stranded and seeking shelter. Just ask the folks the Nantahala Outdoor Center how many times they been at full capacity in April with backpackers ditching the trail. Matter of fact, the NOC area is a common bailing point for would-be thru-hikers who find the AT just too much for them, especially if they started too early!

For some additional reading on the North Carolina section of the Appalachian trail, check out the "Appalachian Trail Guide to Tennessee-North Carolina". The North Carolina AT is also covered in the Appalachian Trail Data Book 2013 by Daniel Chazin. Click here to download the North Carolina section of the AT in GPX file-format (left click on link and select "Save As"). Click here for information on additional North Carolina hiking trails.

TENNESSEE

The Tennessee section of the Appalachian Trail (AT) is a stout 293 mile stretch with elevation ranging from 1,326 feet to 6,625 feet. It follows the border with North Carolina through the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and the Pisgah National Forest. This is mainly ridgeline trail through thick forests. North of Roan High Knob, the route turns into the northeast corner of Tennessee in the Cherokee National Forest and through Laurel Fork Gorge on the way north to Damascus. Along the way, you will ascend some of the highest mountains along the AT with several above 6,000 feet especially in the Great Smokies, including Clingmans Dome at 6,625 feet. Tennessee Appalachian Trail Backpacking
(Click For Tennessee Appalachian Trail Map)

The best time of year to experience this section of the Appalachian Trail is from late May through October. At the higher elevations, snow is common in April and early May which has stranded many thru-hikers. Matter-of-fact the 70 mile stretch through the Great Smoky Mountain National Park has the most rainfall and snowfall on the AT south of the Mason-Dixon line.

For some additional reading on the Tennessee section of the Appalachian trail, check out the "Appalachian Trail Guide to Tennessee-North Carolina". The Tennessee AT is also covered in the Appalachian Trail Data Book 2013 by Daniel Chazin. Click here to download the Tennessee section of the AT in GPX file-format (left click on link and select "Save As"). Click here for information on additional Tennessee hiking trails.

VIRGINIA

The Virginia section of the Appalachian Trail (AT) rolls a massive 550 miles along the western edge of the state. About 25% of the entire AT lies within Virginia from the southern entry near Damascus to the northern exit near Snickers Gap, just south of Harpers Ferry. Along the way, much of the trail is in the Jefferson National Forest, George Washington National Forest and the Shenandoah National Park. The southern sections are beautiful in early summer with blooming rhododendron and azalea. The mid-section passes through mature forests and wilderness. The northern-section parallels Skyline Drive in Shenandoah National Park. The elevations range from 265 feet up to 5,500 feet. Virginia Appalachian Trail Backpacking
(Click For Virginia Appalachian Trail GPX Map)

The southwestern section of the AT in Virginia starts near the best town on the trail, Damascus, and runs through the southern Appalachians in the Mount Rogers Recreation Area and up to Pearisburg (166 miles). You can expect to find numerous breathtaking Azaleas and Rhododendrons. However, you will have to earn them with an ascent of the states highest peak, Mount Rogers.

The central section of the AT in Virginia runs about 266 miles from Pearisburg in the south up to the southern edge of Shenandoah National Park. It starts with a crossing of the Great Valley of the Appalachians in the Jefferson National Forest and up to the Allegheny Plateau. For some thru-hikers, this is one of their favorite sections. Next, the route parallels the Blue Ridge Parkway with many difficult climbs up 2,000 and 3,000 foot balds. Luckily, it gets gentler as you move north. The best peaks include Dragons Tooth, McAfee Knob, Three Ridges, and Humpback Rock.

The Shenandoah section of the AT in Virginia is a 104 mile stretch through Shenandoah National Park. The trail is very well maintained and heavily travelled. Most of the climbs are a gentle 500 to 1,000 feet. Watch out for busy weekend traffic.

The northern section of the AT in Virginia is a 54 mile stretch from the northern edge of the Shenandoah National Park north to the West Virginia border. The route follows long low ridges that includes the infamous rolling roller-coaster south of Snickers Gap. It is relatively less traveled that other sections of the AT and has a very remote feeling to it.

Appalachian Trail Backpacking

The best time of year to experience this section of the Appalachian Trail is from April to early June. As the summer progresses, the heat and humidity can be oppressive. As Fall comes on, September through early November can be quite pleasant and the October foliage is exceptional.

For some additional reading on the Virginia section of the Appalachian trail, check out the "Appalachian Trail Guide to Northern Virginia", the "Appalachian Trail Guide to Central Virginia", and the "Appalachian Trail Guide to Southwest Virginia". The Virginia AT is also covered in the Appalachian Trail Data Book 2013 by Daniel Chazin. Click here to download the Virginia section of the AT in GPX file-format (left click on link and select "Save As"). Click here for information on additional Virginia hiking trails.

WEST VIRGINIA

The West Virginia section of the Appalachian Trail (AT) runs a brief 4 miles through the northeastern corner of the state. Most notable in this short section is the footbridge across the Potomac River and the passing through historic Harpers Ferry near the ATC HQ. The elevation on this section ranges from 265 feet up to 1,200 feet.

The best time of year to experience this section of the Appalachian Trail is from mid-April through mid-June. As the summer progresses, the heat and humidity can be absolutely oppressive. The best time of year to experience this section of the Appalachian Trail is from mid-April through mid-June. As the summer progresses, the heat and humidity can be absolutely oppressive.

West Virginia Appalachian Trail Backpacking
(Click For West Virginia AT Trail GPS Map)

For some additional reading on the West Virginia section of the Appalachian trail, check out the Appalachian Trail Guide to West Virginia. The West Virginia AT is also covered in the Appalachian Trail Data Book 2013 by Daniel Chazin. Click here to download the West Virginia section of the AT in GPX file-format (left click on link and select "Save As"). Click here for information on additional West Virginia hiking trails.

MARYLAND

The Maryland section of the Appalachian Trail (AT) runs 41 miles through northwestern Maryland. The AT follows a north-south ridgeline of South Mountain. The route connects a string of state parks, including a ridge crest section of South Mountain State Park. It is a challenging section that typically requires 3 to 4 days to traverse. The elevation ranges from 230 feet up to 1,800 feet.

The best time of year to experience this section of the Appalachian Trail is from mid-April through mid-June. As the summer progresses, the heat and humidity can be absolutely oppressive.

Maryland Appalachian Trail Backpacking
(Click For Maryland Appalachian Trail Map)

For some additional reading on the Maryland section of the Appalachian trail, check out the "Appalachian Trail Guide to Maryland". The Maryland AT is also covered in the Appalachian Trail Data Book 2013 by Daniel Chazin. Click here to download the Maryland section of the AT in GPX file-format (left click on link and select "Save As"). Click here for information on additional Maryland hiking trails.

PENNSYLVANIA

The Pennsylvania section of the Appalachian Trail (AT) passes through 229 miles of the southeastern corner of the state. The route follows the northernmost extension of the Blue Ridge and then crosses Cumberland Valley. Past Susquehanna, the trail follows the rim of the east range of the Alleghenies. While there are some relatively easy hiking stretches, part of this section through Pennsylvania is well-known for its boot-bustin rocks. North of the Susquehanna River there are long rocky ridges separated by gaps requiring strenuous climbs up and down. Mid-summer here can be quite hot and humid, and water can be challenging to find as well. Pennsylvania Appalachian Trail Backpacking
(Click For Pennsylvania A.T. Trail Map)

For some additional reading on the Pennsylvania section of the Appalachian trail, check out the "Appalachian Trail Guide to Pennsylvania". The Pennsylvania AT is also covered in the Appalachian Trail Data Book 2013 by Daniel Chazin. Click here to download the Pennsylvania section of the AT in GPX file-format (left click on link and select "Save As"). Click here for information on additional Pennsylvania hiking trails.

NEW JERSEY

The New Jersey section of the Appalachian Trail (AT) briefly runs through 72 miles of northern NJ along the Kittatinny Range. This stretch of the AT is surprisingly rugged and remote. The elevation ranges from 350 feet to 1,685 feet along the route. This section of the AT is known for its bears, bogs, wetlands and the crossing of the scenic Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. New Jersey Appalachian Trail Backpacking
(Click For New Jersey AT Map)

For some additional reading on the New Jersey section of the Appalachian trail, check out the "Appalachian Trail Guide to New York - New Jersey". The New Jersey AT is also covered in the Appalachian Trail Data Book 2013 by Daniel Chazin. Click here to download the New Jersey section of the AT in GPX file-format (left click on link and select "Save As"). Click here for information on additional New Jersey hiking trails.

NEW YORK

The New York section of the Appalachian Trail (AT) runs 88 miles from Sterling Forest State Park in the south near New Jersey to Schaghticoke Mountain in the north near Connecticut. The elevation ranges from 124 feet up to 1,433 feet. Coming from the south, the route skirts around Greenwood Lake and runs northeast through Harriman State Park, Bear Mountain State Park, and Clarence Fahnestock State Park before reaching Schaghticoke Mountain. The route is mainly wooded and surprisingly secluded for being so close to big cities. The trail is mostly flat with a few short steep climbs. New York Appalachian Trail Backpacking
(Click For New York Appalachian Trail GPS Map)

For some additional reading on the New York section of the Appalachian trail, check out the "Appalachian Trail Guide to New York - New Jersey". The New York AT is also covered in the Appalachian Trail Data Book 2013 by Daniel Chazin. Click here to download the New York section of the AT in GPX file-format (left click on link and select "Save As"). Click here for information on additional New York hiking trails.

CONNECTICUT

The Connecticut section of the Appalachian Trail (AT) is a short 52 miles through the northwestern corner of the state. The route meanders along the worn-down remnants of a much loftier mountain range and presents varied scenery. The elevations range from 260 feet up to 2,316 feet. The main features are the Housatonic River Valley and the Taconic Range. There are several stretches along scenic river banks. Connecticut Appalachian Trail Backpacking
(Click For Printable, Zoomable Map)

For some additional reading on the Connecticut section of the Appalachian trail, check out the "Appalachian Trail Guide to Massachusetts-Connecticut". The Connecticut AT is also covered in the Appalachian Trail Data Book 2013 by Daniel Chazin. Click here to download the Connecticut section of the AT in GPX file-format (left click on link and select "Save As"). Click here for information on additional Connecticut hiking trails.

MASSACHUSETTS

The Massachusetts section of the Appalachian Trail (AT) rolls 90 miles through the Berkshire Mountains passing through forested hills and farmland valleys. Of course, there are still several peaks to keep it real, including Mount Everett and Mount Greylock. The summits and rock ledges along the route offer excellent vistas. While there are a few steep ascents foreshadowing the future climbs of the Green and White Mountains, most are short in duration. Massachusetts Appalachian Trail Backpacking
(Click For Printable, Zoomable Map)

For some additional reading on the Massachusetts section of the Appalachian trail, check out the "Appalachian Trail Guide to Massachusetts-Connecticut". The Massachussets AT is also covered in the Appalachian Trail Data Book 2013 by Daniel Chazin. Click here to download the Massachusetts section of the AT in GPX file-format (left click on link and select "Save As"). Click here for information on additional Massachusetts hiking trails.

VERMONT

The Vermont section of the Appalachian Trail (AT) runs about 150 miles from the Massachusetts border northeast to the New Hampshire border while passing through the Green Mountains.

The southwestern section of the AT in Vermont runs from the Massachusetts border for about 100 miles northeast through the Green Mountains. This section follows the infamous Long Trail along the rugged crest of the Green Mountains. Near Killington Mountain and Stratton Mountain, the trail approaches the treeline. At Sherburne Pass, the route traverses high, rugged country of overgrown farm and woodlands heading to the Connecticut River.

Vermont Appalachian Trail Backpacking
(Click For Printable, Zoomable Map)

The eastern section of the AT in Vermont runs from the Green Mountains to the New Hampshire border along the Connecticut River, which is about 50 miles. This stretch passes through high elevation rugged country alternating between forest and overgrown farmland.

The best time of year to experience this section of the Appalachian Trail is from June through September. Prior to June, you can expect to find plenty of muddy trails.

For some additional reading on the Vermont section of the Appalachian trail, check out the "Appalachian Trail Guide to New Hampshire-Vermont". The Vermont AT is also covered in the Appalachian Trail Data Book 2013 by Daniel Chazin. Click here to download the Vermont section of the AT in GPX file-format (left click on link and select "Save As"). Click here for information on additional Vermont hiking trails.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

The New Hampshire section of the Appalachian Trail (AT) rolls 161 miles from the Vermont border across to the Maine border. Along this difficult stretch, there are 117 miles through the rugged White Mountains, including the massive ascent of Mount Washington. The elevations along the New Hampshire section of the AT range from 400 feet all the way up to 6,288 feet atop Mount Washington! While there are some low elevations, much of the trail is above the treeline where the weather changes rapidly. New Hampshire Appalachian Trail Backpacking
(Click For Printable, Zoomable Map)

The eastern section of the AT in New Hampshire from the Vermont border to the start of the White Mountains near Glencliff is a 44 mile stretch rolling from mountain to valley to mountain again. It is a great warmup for what is to come.

The western half of the AT in New Hampshire is from Glencliff through the White Mountains heading east to the Maine border covering about 117 miles. This is one of the most popular backcountry stretches along the entire AT, so you can expect to encounter plenty of other backpackers and crowded shelters. It is mainly above the treeline with dramatic scenery and vistas. Most thru-hikers only cover about 5 to 8 miles each day in this section. There are plenty of steep, scrambling ascents and descents.

The best time of year to experience this section of the Appalachian Trail is during July and August. Earlier than this and you will encounter muddy conditions along with snow patches. Later than this and you will encounter snowy conditions. And, on Mount Washington, you can expect to encounter snow in any month of the year and it is typically very foggy and very windy.

For some additional reading on the New Hampshire section of the Appalachian trail, check out the "Appalachian Trail Guide to New Hampshire-Vermont". The New Hampshire AT is also covered in the Appalachian Trail Data Book 2013 by Daniel Chazin. Click here to download the New Hampshire section of the AT in GPX file-format (left click on link and select "Save As"). Click here for information on additional New Hampshire hiking trails.

MAINE

The Maine section of the Appalachian Trail (AT) rolls 281 miles from the New Hampshire border up to Mount Katahdin. Along this extremely challenging section of the AT, the route passes over a series of rugged 4,000 foot mountains and then runs through gentle forest with lakes and streams. This stretch is considered the most difficult section of the entire Appalachian Trail where many backpackers average less than a mile an hour over many parts. The elevations ranges from as low as 490 feet and all the way up to 5,267 feet! Maine Appalachian Trail Backpacking
(Click For Printable, Zoomable Map)

There are plenty of wet, rocky and muddy descents that require using your arms to grab onto something, anything. There are many fords of mountain streams, with the most treacherous being the Kennebec River, which can be very high at times.

The western section of the AT in Maine is the toughest with its steep 4,000 foot peaks. This section is typically from the New Hampshire border heading east to Bigelow Preserve. It is capped by the infamous Mahoosuc Notch which requires boulder scrambling for over a mile!

The central section of the AT in Maine from Bigelow Preserve to Monson has some of the easiest hiking in Maine, but has the potentially life-threatening crossing of the Kennebec River (look for the free canoe ferry service if running).

The final eastern section of the AT, known by thru-hikers as the Hundred Miles, from Monson to Katahdin runs over disconnected mountains and through forest with ponds and creeks. The mountain summits may be lower than others along the AT, but they have rugged ascents.

The best time of year to experience this section of the Appalachian Trail is from July through mid-September. Lower elevations could be enjoyed from May through June, but snow patches may be present, the trails may be muddy and, of course, in June the black flies are unbearable. By mid-September, the snow can be flying on the summits.

For some additional reading on the Maine section of the Appalachian trail, check out the "Appalachian Trail Guide To Maine". The Maine AT is also covered in the Appalachian Trail Data Book 2013 by Daniel Chazin. Click here to download the Maine section of the AT in GPX file-format (left click on link and select "Save As"). Click here for information on additional Maine hiking trails.

GENERAL INFORMATION

Website: Appalachian Trail Conservancy (304) 535-6331

Book: Appalachian Trail Thru-Hikers Companion 2013 by Leslie Mass

Book: Appalachian Trail Data Book 2013 by Daniel Chazin

Book: Appalachian Trail Thru-Hike Planner by David Lauterborn

GPS: Download GPS Trail Track In GPX File-Format (right-click "Save-As")

GPS: Download GPS Shelter Waypoints In GPX File-Format (right-click "Save-As")

GPS: Download GPS Parking Waypoints In GPX File-Format (right-click "Save-As")















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