Bristlecone Pine Trail Mountain Biking

Northwest of Las Vegas in the Springs Mountains National Recreation Area, the Bristlecone Pine Trail (6.1 miles) is the only mountain biking trail located outside the wilderness area, making it accessible to mountain bikes. It offers scenic views of Lee Canyon Ski Area, Mummy Mountain, and serene aspen groves. The beginning of the trail winds through a picturesque forest abundant with white fir and large quaking aspen. Climbing out of the canyon, the vegetation becomes sparse as the trail reaches a stand of bristlecone pine - the oldest living things in the world. After traveling a little over two miles on a foot trail, the trail follows an abandoned road. A short distance further, in an area resembling a parking lot, is the junction with Bonanza Trail. The trail then descends into a canyon, passing a small grove of aspen before eventually leading to a dirt parking lot.

To reach the trailhead from Las Vegas, head north on US95 for 22 miles. Turn left on SR156. The parking area is accessed by a dirt road located 100 feet north of the McWilliams Campground entrance on State Route 156. Walk south up State Route 156 to return to the upper parking lot of the ski area.

Trail Access: Take State Route 156 south to where it ends in the upper parking lot of Lee Canyon Ski Area. The trail is located to the left, at the end of the parking lot.

Bristlecone Pine Trail Mountain Biking Map



Local Contact(s):  HNF (702) 222-1597; Nevada Tourism (800) NEVADA-8; Blue Diamond Bicycles (702) 875-4500; Just Mountain Bikes (702) 564-5501.

Best Season:  May - Oct.

Average Difficulty:  Moderate

Base Camp:  NFS McWilliams CG

Local Website:  click here

Date Published:  

Date Updated:  7/12/2016

Bristlecone Pine Trail Mountain Biking Map


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