Appalachian Trail Hiking

The Georgia section of the Appalachian Trail (AT) is a short 75 miles through northern Georgia. The southern terminus, or starting point depending on your point of view, of the Appalachian Trail (AT) is located atop remote Springer Mountain, near FS42. The route offers excellent wilderness hiking with road crossings about one-days hike apart. The lower elevations ridges from 3,000 to 4,000 feet in elevation make this stretch a great introduction to would be thru-hikers.

Most hikers start in Amicalola State Park on SR52 and use a 8.5 mile approach trail. The blazed trail is easy to follow and there are 11 three-sided shelters in Georgia. There are six major road crosses, which provide alternate trail access points. The trail is maintained by the Georgia Appalachian Trail Club, in cooperation with the Chattachoochee National Forest. The route passes over Big Cedar Mountain, Blood Mountain, Cowrock Mountain, Rocky Mountain and Tray Mountain, and passes through three wilderness areas, including Raven Cliffs, Tray Mountain and Southern Nanatahala Wilderness Areas. A popular resupply/communications point along the trail is Walasi-Yi Center at Neel's Gap on SR129. Keep in mind that elevations do range from 2,510 feet up to 4,461 feet, so there are a few steep climbs.

The best time of year to experience this section of the Appalachian Trail is from April to early June. Many through hikers are tempted to hit the trail early and venture out in March. They area often disappointed to find plenty of cold rain, sleet and even snow in Georgia. It's best to wait until April, or even late April to start out. Plus, Georgia is very crowded in March and April with plenty of spring break hikers and early thru-hikers. Keep in mind that the heat and humidty in July and August can be down right oppressive. September and October hiking can be very pleasant.

The Appalachian Trail, commonly known by backpackers as the AT, is a popular 2,167 mile thru-hike along a wilderness footpath. The Appalachian Trail is a registered National Scenic Trail that winds along the crest of the Appalachian Mountains from Georgia in the south to Maine in the north. More specifically, the AT runs through the scenic wooded and pastoral lands of fourteen eastern US states, stretching from Springer Mountain, Georgia, in the south to Mount Katahdin, Maine, in the north. The Appalachian Trail route is more than 99 percent protected by either federal ownership, state ownership or designated rights-of-way from local land owners.

Appalachian Trail Hiking Map



Local Contact(s):  Appalachian Trail Conservancy (304) 535-6331

Best Season:  Apr. - May

Average Difficulty:  Moderate

Local Website:  click here

Date Published:  

Date Updated:  6/21/2016

Appalachian Trail Hiking Map


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